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Saturday, December 8, 2018

Mark of the beast

As a young boy, I remembered hearing a story in the book of Revelations. When the devil came back to Earth, he would command people to follow him. He would command a lot of people. In order to buy/sell/engage in commerce, people would have to have a mark on the forehead.

As a young boy, I thought this was just a legend. At best, maybe it was a metaphor. Having a mark to display your submission is odd. Who would agree to this? And why would you need a mark just to buy a loaf of bread?

Some people would dismiss this story as a silly myth. Others believe it to be a prophesy of things to come. If you needed a mark just to engage in commerce, this would mean that you are completely controlled by something. And if you had this mark taken away, you would probably die or have to comply to get it back.

The closest system I've heard of this today would be some sort of social credit score. Today, when a man's personal information is all over the internet, an organization could monitor what a man did/would do/or even thinks. In other countries, I've heard that acting or behaving in a way the government doesn't like would have you restricted from travel or even using a checking account. In the future, a man could be thrown in prison just because he doesn't like the selection of stamps issued by the post office. This is what people fear when hearing mention of the mark of the beast.

But I wonder what the mark of the beast is really referring to. After all, there are several systems today that control a man. The IRS comes to mind. You can be tracked with your social security number and you need to provide that number whenever you want to open up a bank account, get a drivers license, get a credit card, get a passport, etc, etc. And if you act out of line or commit acts of fraud, you can be arrested and thrown into jail.

So I wonder if we are already living in the world that Revelations foretold.

Monday, November 5, 2018

$3,000 accumulation

Following off the $1,000 and $2,000 accumulation strategies, the strategy for $3,000 may be slightly different.

In the United States, Summer vacation can last from 10 to 12 weeks. And accumulating $2,000 can be achieved completely during 12 weeks given the correct circumstances.

Accumulating $3,000 during Summer vacation could be possible but the task would be more difficult to do as accumulating $2,000 would take 8.88 weeks based off of the same parameters.

For this particular scenario, we will assume the $2,000 was accumulated within 9 weeks and we will drop the hours worked due to high school hours taking a priority.

Player One is making minimum wage but after 9 weeks, drops his hours to 20 per week. We also assume that Player One has zero living expenses so all take home pay can be retained.

$7.50 hourly multiplied by 20 hour work weeks equals $150 weekly. Assuming 25% is taken out of every paycheck, Player One's take home pay would be about $112 weekly.

Saving up the extra $1,000 would take an additional 8.88 weeks bringing the total time to about 18 weeks to accumulate $3,000. This is possible to do as a 16, 17, or 18 year old kid.

Now if high school is not an issue for the following reasons:

Graduated high school
Home schooled
High school dropout

The strategy remains unchanged for the $2,000 accumulation strategy and the time to accumulate $3,000 would be about 13 to 14 weeks.

This sort of goal would be reasonable for buying a cheap used car if desired.

Monday, October 29, 2018

$2,000 accumulation

Following off the strategy for $1,000 accumulation, reaching $2,000 does not require that much more effort or a change to the existing strategy.

Keeping the same variables in place, Player One just needs to work for 8.88 weeks at $7.50 hourly with 40 hour weeks. This assumes a weekly take home paycheck of about $225 (assuming 25% deductions from gross earnings).

This is the situation that a high school kid around the age of 16 or 17 can face during summer vacation.

With Summer being around 12 weeks long, a high school kid can reasonably accumulate $2,000 while living with parents and no real expenses to take care of.

This sort of strategy can be very useful for saving up for a first car such as a 90's Toyota or Honda.


Saturday, October 27, 2018

$1,000 accumulation

Accumulating $1,000 is not a difficult task depending on circumstances.

Consistent wages from a W-2 job can be available to teenagers from the ages of 14 to 16 depending on location. Entry level jobs tend to have a minimum wage around $7.50 hourly.

If $1,000 is the end goal, one possible path to achieve the goal is as follows.

Player one is age 16 and currently lives with his parents during high school.
Where he lives, he has access to various retail stores, restaurants, or grocery stores.

During summer vacation, he takes on one or two jobs at minimum wage and makes sure to get 40 hours per week.

His home is in close proximity to work sites (walking or biking).

$7.50 at 40 hours per week is $300. Assuming 25% is withheld for deductions, his weekly take home pay is $225 per week.

Further assumptions include that player one has no living expenses as those are covered by the parents.

$1,000 goal can be achieved in 4.44 weeks.


Thursday, September 20, 2018

Random Skateboard Memories: Sparks

Sparks


Skateboards are pretty magical. To this day, I still have no idea how slappy crooked grinds work. As a little kid, you
would play the video games and you would see sparks shoot out from your skateboard everytime you grind a rail.
In real life, that just doesn’t happen. However, it is possible to see sparks fly out when you are skateboarding, its
just pretty rare.


It is pretty rare unless you use a device that you stick to your tail to make sparks while you skid but let’s pretend
that product just doesn’t exist.


I’ve seen sparks shoot out while I’ve been skating. To see this occurrence, you want to be skating at night. It
doesn’t make the sparks happen easier but skating at night makes the sparks easier to see.


Start out by doing a flip trick and just mess up. If you get lucky, the bolt of your truck locking your wheel to the axle
will hit the asphalt at just the right speed and angle. It will shave off either a tiny bit of metal or tiny bit of rock and
it will spark because of the force of impact.

Once, in Florida, I was skating with my friend Adam and he was trying to do a kickflip over a pyramid. He bailed
half way and was just trying to dodge his board so he wouldn’t trip over it. His board slid primo over the concrete
and shot out about 10 to 20 sparks, quite rare indeed.  

Saturday, September 15, 2018

Random Skateboard Memories: Sparks

Sparks


Skateboards are pretty magical. To this day, I still have no idea how slappy crooked grinds work. As a little kid, you
would play the video games and you would see sparks shoot out from your skateboard everytime you grind a rail.
In real life, that just doesn’t happen. However, it is possible to see sparks fly out when you are skateboarding, its
just pretty rare.


It is pretty rare unless you use a device that you stick to your tail to make sparks while you skid but let’s pretend
that product just doesn’t exist.


I’ve seen sparks shoot out while I’ve been skating. To see this occurrence, you want to be skating at night. It
doesn’t make the sparks happen easier but skating at night makes the sparks easier to see.


Start out by doing a flip trick and just mess up. If you get lucky, the bolt of your truck locking your wheel to the
axle will hit the asphalt at just the right speed and angle. It will shave off either a tiny bit of metal or tiny bit of rock
and it will spark because of the force of impact.

Once, in Florida, I was skating with my friend Adam and he was trying to do a kickflip over a pyramid. He bailed
half way and was just trying to dodge his board so he wouldn’t trip over it. His board slid primo over the concrete
and shot out about 10 to 20 sparks, quite rare indeed.  

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Random Skateboard Memories: Massive Backside Grab

My first couple of times at a skatepark, I couldn’t do that much. I could barely ollie and couldn’t do any flip tricks,
grind, or launch any airs. The only thing I could do was drop in on some transition and roll up and down some
ramps. Of course, there were some ramps I would never think of dropping in on.


Towards the back of the park, there was a 12 foot vert ramp. This thing was a beast. At the time, it was the only
ramp I ever saw that had a flight of stairs to walk up just to get to the top of the ramp. Just out of curiosity, I
walked up to the top of the ramp and looked down. And all I saw was complete death. It could have been my
eyes playing tricks on me but it looked like the top of the ramp caved in on itself. The top didn’t look vertical.
It looked like you would drop 2 or 3 feet before catching transition. This vert ramp was either the biggest ramp
in the park or tied for it. There was one ramp that was probably bigger.


At the very back of the park was a massive quarterpipe that covered the entire back wall. There was a section
cut out making a channel gap because exit doors to the skate park were located there. This quarterpipe was at
least 12 feet tall.


I don’t think it was ever intended for anyone to hit the coping or do a halfpipe air on it because the top couple of
feet were covered with various stickers. Just slapping a sticker as high as you could was an achievement.

When I was young, I was standing in the back area of the park and I saw this one guy barel down
some ramps heading towards the giant quarter pipe. He launched himself up and I saw this guy get about
2 to 3 feet above the coping. He grabbed the board backside so he was doing a melon grab 2 to 3 feet out. He
couldn’t go too much higher otherwise he’d hit the ceiling. After floating there for a moment his wheels touched
down a few feet below transition and he rolled away perfect. He was the only man I saw that ever did that.